Steelhead

4 Best Lures For Steelhead In Rivers – Must Have Lures

Best Steelhead Lures

Advice And Tips From A Pro

As a top river guide, it is very important to know what the best lures for steelhead are for different types of water and in different river conditions. It’s also important to know how to use them in the most effective way.

My 5 best lures for steelhead will account for over 90% of the steelhead caught in the rivers around the great lakes and they will work great on the west coast rivers too.

Many anglers do not fish lures as effectively as they could which is why I will share with you my top 5 best lures for steelhead and some guide tips that I give to my clients on how to use them properly for more steelhead.

If you use the best lures for steelhead combined with my 4 best steelhead baits when you go fishing for steelhead you will likely catch more steelhead than ever.

The Spinner – The Best Steelhead Lure

The Spinner Is The Best Steehead Lure
The simple spinner is likely the best steelhead lure there is.

On many guide trips, the first lure I will try is the simple but time tested spinner. I consider spinners to be one of the best lures for steelhead for river steelhead.

If this lure is fished well it can be the best steelhead lure in both great lakes rivers and in west coast rivers.

The key to fishing this lure well is to let the current do most of the work for you and to get the spinner down to within 2 or 3 feet of the steelhead.

How To Use A Spinner For Steelhead?

In order to use a spinner well and get the best results, I cast the spinner across the river, and on a slightly down river angle and then retrieve it at less than half the speed that I think I should. Basically it’s a super slow retrieve that almost feels way too slow, but it works.

Even though it’s a super slow retrieve the current will spin those blades for you and will swing it across and in front of the fish at a slow and enticing speed.

Both aggressive and less aggressive fish may strike out at a slow-moving spinner whereas a fast spinner may only get the most aggressive fish to feed, and that may mean less fish for you at the end of the day.

The exception to this is that if you feel like the fish are very aggressive and will hit the faster retrieve, it may be better to use a faster retrieve because you can make more casts, cover more water, and therefore you should catch more fish.

Keep in mind that a retrieve on a downriver angle that is reeled in too fast will stay high in the water and might be way over their heads, and a retrieve that is too slow will hit too much bottom. If a faster retrieve is what you want to do keep the tip of the rod below the water and it will help keep your spinner deeper and also use a spinner that gets down deeper, see my favorites below.

For a normal to slow retrieve, I recommend that my clients set the drag perfect and keep the rod two feet off the water for a better hook set and to keep the lure down deep. Point the rod tip straight at the spinner but don’t pull it, let the current swing it across the pool for you. If you start hitting bottom, maintain the same speed but lift the rod tip higher to try to keep the lure 2 to 3 feet off the bottom. You may need to keep going higher and higher to prevent hooking to much bottom.

Guide Tip – The biggest mistake I see anglers do is to not cover the water very well, they aimlessly cast all over the place when they should be fan casting and covering the water systematically covering every foot of the spot they are fishing.

The difference between an angler casting aimlessly and one that covers the entire spot is 10 to 1 sometimes.

The other mistake I see all the time is anglers casting up the river, which often means they have to reel extra fast to get those blades spinning and to keep the lure off the bottom. But, that extra fast lure coming straight at the fish means that it may be too fast and the fish will miss it or not hit it at all.

What Size Spinners Are Best For Steelhead?

I prefer to use sizes 3 and 4 for most river conditions and will start with a size 3 first and work up to a size 4 or even size 5 to see what the steelhead wants.

Under dirtier water conditions I will often go bigger, up to a size 5 and under low and clear water conditions I will sometimes start with a size 2 spinner and work up to a size 3 or 4.

What Is The Best Spinner Colors For Steelhead

My go-to spinner color on clear or green water is to start with a silver blade spinner that has a silver body or colored body first. See picture.

If the steelhead don’t eat the silver color I will start to rotate through colors trying to find out which color they want.

After the silver color, I will try a gold blade spinner, and if that doesn’t seem to work I will go to chartreuse, pink, black and orange blades to try to determine what it is that they want.

If the water is dirty I will go to chartreuse or a black spinner in a size 5 and I prefer spinners that make a lot of noise like a Vibrax Spinner because even if they can see the spinner that may be able to home in on it by the vibration.

For night time lure fishing I also prefer very loud spinners and my best color is usually black. The clack silhouette seams to stand out and is easy for them to find.

Single Hook Or Treble Hook Spinners For Steelhead

I tend to use a single hook most of the time for a few good reasons.

First, I like to get my spinner down to the fish and I find that the single hook doesn’t hook up as much as a treble hook and therefore I don’t lose as many lures.

A big single hook seems to hook as many fish as a treble hook due to the larger gape but the single hook doesn’t do as much damage to a fish that you plan on releasing. Treble hooks can also be a nightmare when they get tangled in the net but the single hooks are not so bad because the hook is usually in the fishes’ mouth.

Prevent Line Twist With Spinners

Adding a quality size 3 or 4 snap swivel like the ones from Owner or a size 6 VMC Snap Swivels may prevent unwanted line twist and make it easier for you to change colors and sizes.

My Favorite Spinners For Steelhead

I have been a big fan of Vibrax spinners fr many species including steelhead and it is because of the amount of vibration that these sinners produce below the water.

I’ve seen fish move a long way to hit a Vibrax spinner and I truly believe that a Vibrax spinner makes so much noise that some fish will feel the vibrations before they even see the lure.

When night fishing the Vibrax lure even vibrates so much that I can feel when the lure is close to the tip of my rod tip before it hits my rod tip.

I also like that Vibrax spinners come in a fast deep water design and a normal or slower water design and that they have a tone of great colors.

Best All-Around

This is the spinner I use the most and under most river conditions. It can be retrieved fast or slow and shallow or semi-deep.

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Deep and Fast

This is one of the best spinners that I use for deep and faster water. It really gets down,

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Blue Fox Vibrax Minnow Spin lure looks like a minnow bait but with the added flash of the spinner.

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I have also had good results with Mepps and Panther Martin spinners. Panther Martins were the best sellers in my store and my store customers swore by them.

The KwikFish Is One Of The Best Steelhead Lures

The Kwikfish lure has been one of my most productive and best lures for steelhead in all kinds of water conditions and is still my favorites steelhead lure in cold water.

The Kwikfish lure has been around for a long time and is still one of the best lures for steelhead for great lakes and west coast steelhead that I know of.

Another one of the best lures for steelhead that is almost exactly the same as the Kwickfish is a lure called the Flatfish. It has the same basic shape, size, and action, and some anglers may have used and will prefer this one over the Kwikfish. You may also find some different colors to try in the Flatfish.

How To Fish A Kwikfish For Steelhead

What makes this lure so good is the action and the ability to move it slowly. This lure has a crazy back and forth wide wobble that drive fish crazy. Both aggressive and neutral fish will smash this lure when it’s wobbling in their face.

I fish this lure similar to the way I fish spinners with an across and slightly downriver angle and with a super slow retrieve as it swings across the pool. Working the lure deep and moving it 3 feet down each time I cast will cover the water well.

If I hit bottom I simply lift my tip up a couple feet to keep it just over their heads. If I hit bottom again I lift the rod tip even higher.

Be careful not to reel this lure to fast as in tend to run sideways and come up if you do. Keep it low and slow!

If one color doesn’t work, start rotating through colors until you find a color that work for you.

The Best Kwikfish Colors For Steelhead?

This lure comes in a bunch of great color and color combinations, and I have a few favorites that work really well for me.

For low and clear water conditions I will use more natural colors like the skunk which is my best color even in bigger water, but silvers and golds can sometimes be good in lower clear water too since these colors can resemble bait fish or small trout and salmon. Just make sure you use the right sizes.

For dirty water I like to go with chartreuse, and silver or a combination of silver and bright florescent colors.

For most normal medium to large size rivers with clear to greenish water I do really well with the colors MJ-Black-Holo Glitter, Slammer, Silver Pink Mamba, and Black Chrome Red Streak but there are a lot of other colors that work.

I tend to rotate through all my colors and sizes until I find out what they want.

Just like with all lures, the key to success is to cover the spot well with each color.

To do this effectively it’s not uncommon for me to work 1 color like silver through the entire spot, moving down 2 to 3 feet with each cast and work all the way to the bottom of the pool and then move back up to the top of the pool and do it again with an opposite or contrasting color.

This means if I started with a shiny color like silver, my second color I might go straight to a black or very dark color and if that doesn’t work maybe then switch to something very bright and weird like chartreuse or orange.

The Best Kwikfish Sizes For Steelhead?

For smaller rivers I will stick with the 2 3/4 inch Kwikfish which is usually big enough for small and larger steelhead.

In the medium to larger-sized rivers or when the water is really clear I will still catch a lot of fish on the 2 3/4 size and that is the size that I will often start with, in fact, it’s usually my go-to size most of the time but there are times when a larger size is better.

There are times when the steelhead will be more aggressive and attack a larger sized lure, or there are times when I need to get a bit deeper so I will start to increase the size to 3 3/8, and even up to 4 1/4 inches.

I make sure I always have an assortments of colors in the 2 3/4 and 3 3/8 sizes.

There are a couple of different models of the Kwikfish and I like the Kwikfish X-Treme the most. I have checked Amazon and Bass Pro Shops and the best prices and best assortment of colors and sizes that I have found for this lure and many lures on this page are at Fish USA. But shop around in case you can find a better price or get free shipping somewhere else.

Spoons Are One Of The Best Lures For Steelhead

Spoons are one of the best lures for steelhead.
Spoons are one of the best lures for steelhead if you know how to use them properly.

I had the opportunity to fish with a client that wanted to fish steelhead with spoons and I think I learned more than he did that day. I put him in the rights spots and he went to work catching steelhead after steelhead.

I realized then that if you fish spoons properly, spoons could be deadly on steelhead and that spoons are one of the best lures for steelhead in rivers.

Making sure you have the right sizes, weights and colors will make a big difference too.

How Do You Fish Spoons For Steelhead?

Just like the Spinners and the Kwikfish, slow and low is how you want to fish a spoon.

The way I fish steelhead spoons is to cast it across and slightly upriver and then let the spoon drift freely for 5 to 10 feet to get it down. The slower and shallower the water the less I let it sink. Once the spoon is just a little bit downriver from me I will lower my rod tip and start a super slow retrieve.

You should feel the spoon wobbling as you retrieve it and if you hit bottom just lift your rod tip up a little to keep it from hitting bottom again and to keep the spoon 1 to 3 feet off the bottom.

Move down and repeat those steps. If a steelhead hits the spoon it will be hard and fast so you won’t have problems detecting a strike.

If the water is shallower I will cast my spoons across and down river and start my retrieve much sooner so it won’t sink so deep. I will also use a lighter spoon in shallower slower water and a heavier spoon in deeper faster water.

Spoons like the Krocodile spoon below I will sometimes jig or jump the spoon across the bottom. This involves letting it sink longer and then retrieving very slow and once I hit bottom I will lift the tip of my rood a few feet and slowly reel until it hits the bottom and again and then I lift the tip of the rod and repeat. This has been an amazing tactic for me for lots of fish.

Adding a quality size 3 or 4 snap swivel like the ones from Owner or a size 6 VMC Snap Swivels may give your spoons more action and make it easier for you to change colors and sizes.

Best Spoon Color For Steelhead

When it comes to color my go-to color is silver in most river conditions because the silver flash and wobble of a spoon can resemble the baitfish that they see out in the lake or ocean.

I also use combinations of silver with green and blue. In dirty water I will use bright colors like chartreuse and hot orange or pink.

Some spoons even come in a glow in the dark finish and they can be really good for day and night fishing.

Best Spoon Size For Steelhead

I prefer spoons in the 2 inch to 3-inch size for most river sizes and flows. For bigger rivers like the Niagara where the is lots of baitfish for the steelhead to feed I may go up to 4 inches.

Some spoons are also very heavy so if the river you fish or the area you want to fish is smaller, shallower, and slower you may want to consider a spoon that is still in that 2 to 3-inch length but isn’t so heavy. The 1/4 oz Krocodile spoon is 2 1/8 inches and is a good choice for this type of water.

Most of the spoons I use for medium to larger rivers are in the 1/2 oz. to 3/4 oz.

Spoons that are too heavy will end up snagging on the bottom too much and I find lighter spoons wobble better in the current.

Guide Tip – Replace the hooks to a large wide gap hook so you don’t snag up and lose as many spoons to the bottom.

The Best Steelhead Spoons

Little Cleo

Heavy Spoon- Good for faster and deeper water. I prefer the 2/5 oz and the 3/4 oz.

My Best Colors:

  • Green Anchovy
  • Blue Anchovy
  • Green Splatter
  • Blue Digger
  • Hammered Nickle
  • Hammered Nickle Green
  • Hammered Nickle Blue

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Krocodile Spoon

This is one of the best spoons I have used for steelhead. I mostly use the 1/2 oz. and the 3/4oz,

My Best Colors

  • Chrome-Silver Prism Lite
  • Rainbow Trout
  • Chrome
  • Hammered Chrome Neon Blue
  • Green Prism Lite
  • Chrome Green Mackerel

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Eppinger Original Dardevle

A good spoon for all river conditions. I use the 2.5 oz / 2 1/4 inch size.

My Best Colors

  • Scale Chartreuse/Black Stripe
  • Nickle
  • Gold
  • Hammered Nickel-Green
  • Hammered Nickel-Blue
  • Shad (Alewife)

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Hardbaits For More Steelhead – The Steelheaders Secret Weapon

Best Steelhead Bait - The Crank Bait
The Crankbait, also known as a Bodybait is one of the best steelhead baits.

I started fishing for steelhead with crankbaits over 35 years ago. As a teenage kid, I liked watching as the steelhead would shoot across the pool and smash the lure.

Today, I still think that the crankbait is one of the best lures for steelhead that you can use and is a must-have in any anglers tackle box.

I use crankbaits in a few different styles for different conditions. I use the fat style baits with a deep diving lip in medium to deep water with slow to medium speeds.

I like long profile crank baits with a shallower diving lip for faster shallower water.

I tend to use a medium to deep diving crank most often because I can control my depth by lifting or lowering my rod tip.

Fishing Crankbaits For Steelhead.

Since crank baits don’t require time to sink I simply cast them straight across the river or slightly down river and then slowly retrieve them and let them swing across the river. I prefer a slow steady retrieve that allows the crankbait to wobble a lot.

A little trick I learned a long time ago was to twitch or rip the crankbait about every 10 feet to trigger a strike.

If you start bumping the bottom, just lift your rod up higher to try to keep the crankbait 1 to 3 feet off the bottom. If you hit bottom too much you should switch your crankbait to a shallower diving bait.

Guide Tip – The biggest mistake most anglers make is not getting the crankbait down far enough on rivers where you can’t see the bottom. This is why I like deep diving crankbaits, I reel them in with a low rod tip until I hit bottom and then I lift the rod tip 3 to 6 feet which should bring the crankbait up and off the bottom.

Just like the other lures that I mentioned above, it’s important to cover the water well and not miss an inch. I tend to cast, retrieve, and then step down 2 to 3 feet and cast again in the same direction and then repeat.

Each time I step down another 2 to 3 feet my lure should also move downriver 2 to 3 feet which allows me to cover the water 2 to 3 feet at a time which gets my lure in front of all the steelhead. I think under most river conditions a steelhead will move 3 to 5 feet to hit a well-presented lure.

I almost always tie my line directly to my crank baits with no snap swivels.

Best Crankbait Size For Steelhead

The best size crankbait for steelhead is between 2.5 inches and 4 inches with most of my crankbaits being around 3.5 inches. Crankbaits in the 3.5 inch size is what I would consider a perfect bite-size for most average sized steelhead and an irresistible meal.

The Best CrankBait Colors For Steelhead

Crankbaits are used for many species and that means there are tons of great colors to choose from.

Like many of my lures, I like my Crankbaits in colors that match the natural forage, like minnows, small trout, and steelhead, chub or suckers.

Silver and black, silver and blue, silver and green are always good choices but I have had great success with crankbaits in bright colors like orange and chartreuse too.

Strike King KVD 200 Jerkbait

A good crank bait that runs 4 to 7 feet and is in that perfect 4 inch length.

My Best Colors:

  • Carolina Chrome
  • Clown
  • Chartreuse Sexy Shad
  • Blue Digger
  • Sugar Daddy
  • Sexy Blue Back Herring
  • Pro Gold

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Rapala Tail Dancer

Get deeper with this Rapala that runs 9 to 15 feet. I like the 2 3/4 and the 3.5 inch sizes.

My Best Colors

  • Silver
  • Shad
  • Perch
  • Hot Chub
  • Blue

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Eppinger Original Dardevle

A short fat model that runs 4 to 8 feet.

My Best Colors

  • Gizzard Shad
  • Green Shad
  • Prism Chartreuse Perch
  • Prism Shad
  • Blue Back Chartreuse

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The Right Gear For Using Lures For Steelhead

It’s as important to use the right rods, reels, and line for steelhead as it is to use the best lures for steelhead.

You want a reel that has a nice smooth drag, holds plenty of line for those long runs and casts well, and can also be used for float fishing. For the best reels that I have used and that I recommend to my clients, I have a dedicated page on the best spinning reels for steelhead that is worth checking out.

The steelhead rod you should be using should have enough length to manage and play a big steelhead and also enable you to lift the tip of the rod high enough to keep your lures off the bottom.

It should also be good for float fishing or bottom bouncing in case the steelhead are not in the mood to chase steelhead. Check out the steelhead Spinning rods that I use and recommend.

The right line can make all the difference so make sure you have a line on that is strong enough to handle big steelhead, durable enough to take a beating on the rocks, and invisible enough to not spook the fish. I have a couple of favorites that I discuss on the Best Line For Spinning Reels page

Love To Hear From You To

I am always trying to learn something new. That’s why I still fish with and train with some of the best anglers, guides, and fishing coaches in the world. If you have a lure that you think is one of the best lures for steelhead, or you have a great color or size that works for you please share in the comments below.

Happy Fishing

Graham

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